Supporters' Association

Examiner Reports: July 2017

Examiner articles by year:

2012

March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December

2013

January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December

2014

January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December

2015

January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December

2017

January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December

2017

January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December

Contents

5th
12th
19th
26th

5th

Let us delve into the archives this week with a section from 'Standing On The Shoulders Of Giants'.

Seeking winter time sporting thrills, on Saturday 27 January 1866, 20 members of the Huddersfield Athletic Club and 'a similar number of members of the local Rifle Corps' played a 'football match' on the Rifle Field. The match was drawn, scoreless, and a second was arranged which, after several postponements, was played in late February 1866, this time with 15 players per side.

Future developments at the club strongly suggest that the type of 'football' played in these matches would have resembled rugby union. The Football Association (FA) had been formed and had written its first set of rules in 1863, formalising the split between the association football and what would become rugby football. The formation of the Rugby Football Union (RFU) in 1871 crystallised the divergence of football into two distinct codes. There is no evidence that the FA's rules of 1863 had any bearing on the football played by members of the Huddersfield Athletic Club.

At the Huddersfield Athletic Club's second Annual General Meeting (AGM) in November 1866, Mr A Bradley announced that the club, now comprising 194 members, was to form a football section. Members of the football section began to play amongst themselves at the Rifle Field on 1 December, but received little practical support from the committee and, although the club had over £154 in the bank, no financial support.

They briefly moved from the Rifle Field in October 1867 when Mr Edward Brooke, a vice-president of the club, made a field available to them. He also organised an exhibition match between teams representing Manchester and Leeds, which was played at Fieldhouse, off Leeds Road. A large crowd enjoyed the novel spectacle, some of them closely studying techniques, team formations and tactics that they could aspire to. Other exhibition matches were arranged, including two between Liberals and Conservatives. Inspired by these displays and by the provision of a field on which to practise at the home of one of their players, Percy Learoyd, Huddersfield Athletic Club at last assembled 'a proper team.'

The football section began to run itself as a semi-independent entity, electing Fred Learoyd as Chairman and Mr HB Dransfield as secretary. As the HAC still provided no financial assistance, playing members paid a subscription of 2s 6d to cover running costs and rent of the Rifle Field for matches.

Coming right bang up to date, the Huddersfield Cup will take place at the Dram Centre on July 22nd.

There will be a whole host of entertainment with the event being in memory of John Colletta.

John was just 19 when he was killed in a car crash in November, 1997.

The Dalton teenager was a second team player tipped for a bright future in the sport.

12th

To kick off this week we will blow our own trumpet.

Sheila and Trevor Kaye presented Ken Davy with a cheque for £1000 at the Widnes game.

This money will go towards the development of youth rugby.

So, what did Danny Brough tell us last Tuesday?

On his impending move to Hull/KR/Wigan/Leigh/Salford/Toronto/Underbank/etc, he stated that he still had 18 months to go on his contract and would see it out.

He is passionate about winning and always has been. He gives 100% to any team he is playing for.

He thinks that there ought to be a Rugby League style British Lions team. And yes, he would have liked to have played for it, but he can only see himself playing for Scotland now.

What will he do when he eventually retires? "Not really sure."

Would he like to be a coach? "No, there's no job security."

What about refereeing? "** but I couldn't be any worse!"

Would he like to be in charge of referees? "No, because…" **

Now, about the Cricket Day when you got your son out. "He's got to learn, hasn't he?"

What is it like playing for Scotland? "It's great. They're a great bunch of lads. You can't really coach them for a game when you've only a few days together before a match.

"But you can have a great time bonding – especially the night before. **"

** As usual, Danny spoke from the heart and some of his comments were too controversial for a family newspaper!

If you want to know the full story our guests tell, come along to Turnbridge on the first Tuesday of the month. August will be Martyn Sadler.

HGSA members get double, sorry, treble for their money these days.

Not only do we have our monthly guest at Turnbridge, we also have a player in the HD1 Bar.

Last week it was Jordan Turner.

Jordan is enjoying life on the proper side of the Pennines [he's an Oldham lad!]. He went on to say that he will be fit enough to play against Leigh.

And the treble?

Our inimitable host. It's not called the Brian Blacker Roadshow for nothing!

Come along this Friday to see which of our non-playing stars will be playing second fiddle to him.

It is that time of year when we need to be thinking about who should receive the Wagstaff Trophy.

And for those who do not like the way HGSA is run – and everyone else! - our AGM will be in October.

Find out more about both these – and more - through our website, www.GiantsSupporters.co.uk.

19th

So what is the Wagstaff Trophy?

First of all, Harold Wagstaff was born on 19 May 1891 in Holmfirth.

He played for Underbank Rangers before signing for Fartown, making his debut against Bramley on 10th November 1906.

Harold was [and is] known as 'The Prince of Centres'.

He was the inspiration of the 'Team of All Talents' in 1914-15, when Fartown became the second club to win all four cups.

He became the game's youngest International at 17 years 228 days.

By 1914 he was captain of England and played the best match of his career in the famous 'Rorke's Drift Test Match' victory at Sydney. [Look that one up, it will lift anyone's day.]

His last match was on 23 March 1925 v Oldham.

It was only fitting, therefore, that when the HGSA committee decided to award a trophy at the end of a season it should be named after Harold.

Scott Grix was the first recipient. Danny Brough monopolised it for the next three years. Jermaine McGillvary is the incumbent for the past two years.

Who will it be this time?

What it is not is a 'player of the season' award, it is club-wide.

When casting your vote use the loose criteria 'Whom would I least like to leave the Giants?'.

It could be an up and coming youngster like Izaac Farrell; perhaps our loan signing Martyn Rityard; someone who's only played a handful of games like Jake Mamo; that blockbusting forward Sebastine Ikahififo; Danny or Jerry again; etc, etc.

The choice is yours [assuming you are a HGSA member!].

You are allowed three votes: your first choice will get 3 points, second two, and third one. The winner is whoever has most points.

The winner will be announced at the Giants Awards evening and will be presented with his or her trophy at our AGM on October 10th at Turnbridge WMC.

Voting forms will be available at our next meeting at Turnbridge [Martyn Sadler] and at the HD1 Bar when we next play at the stadium.

Alternatively you can enter online through our website, www.GiantsSupporters.co.uk.

Both methods will enable you to nominate people for your next committee.

See you at Old Trafford?

26th

From our Ipswich Branch:

And lo, it came to pass that the Giants did smite the Centurions at the John Smith's field thereby securing an automatic place in Super League 2018. It is only fitting that there should be a comment from the club's supporters association about this result for it is no mean achievement. It should now be clear to all that Rick Stone's influence is starting to write itself on the way the Huddersfield Giants are now playing the game. True the team is harder and faster than last year but more than that the side once again seems to be playing with verve, purpose, and self-belief.

I was discussing these matters with my ever-loving wife on the (long) road home to East Anglia after the match. These conversations usually begin passing the Emley Moor Mast, continue down the M1, M18 A1 and ending on the A14 at Bury St Edmunds. Having now sat in the Director's box last season (you may remember she won the prize in the lottery) and just about mastered the 6 tackle rule my ever-loving feels well qualified to comment. They (the Giants) are trying to play the game in their opponents half thereby putting pressure on the opposition forcing them to make errors. Danny Brough is using the kick to turn the opposing team around and making them run backwards. It's dispiriting. If it's one thing forwards hate it is running backwards towards the ball rather than, well, forwards with the ball. I was amazed at her insight. Up to now I thought she came along to keep me company and to watch big fellas clatter into one another.

It certainly seems that the Giants are playing to a game plan and look a much better side compared to last year. The fans have clearly taken to the new style of play getting behind the team at every opportunity. Last week the Britannia Rescue stand was in particularly good voice especially when "Fartown...Fartown" breaks out. From the opposite stands that sounds really exciting and uplifting. I know what it does to me so it must really lift our players. And why not? Huddersfield is the birthplace of the Rugby League which is so proudly displayed on the claret and gold. The fans of other teams, rather jealously I have always thought, occasionally criticise us for being backward looking and refusing to move forward. Not a bit of it. The Fartown fans have a good sense of their place in the history of the game. You need to know where you have come from in order to know where you are going. The Huddersfield Giants know where they are going and it is towards the top trophies currently on offer. What we need to develop is that sense of entitlement to be at the top of Super League. The very history of the club should serve our right of entitlement to be in the top four if not at the very top itself way into the foreseeable future. I and my ever-loving wife are looking forward to the rest of the season and the inevitable rise of the Giants.

Reproduced by kind permission of the Huddersfield Examiner
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